Kris Sanford Photography Pride Month Sale!

Jun 7, 2018

In celebration of June 2018 Pride, Kris Sanford's series titled Through the Lense of Desire is on sale until the end of month!

"Growing up queer, I was in search of a history that spoke to me—included me. Out of a collection of my grandma’s old family snapshots I created an imaginary queer past, pulling out those photos that pictured men together and women together. The images in this series are works of fiction that have moved beyond my family collection.  The individuals seen here serve as characters in a search to uncover hidden stories of love and desire."

10 x 10 inch prints from this series, originally retail $600 unframed and $650 framed are available 30% off  at $420 unframed and $455 framed until June 30th.

Please enjoy images from the collection below.

For purchases or inquires please contact us at (713) 524-5070 or gallery@catherinecouturier.com.

 

Kris Sanford, Bathing Suits

Bathing Suits, 2015
archival inkjet print
10 x 10”in.
edition of 20

Kris Sanford, Boots

Boots, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

Kris Sanford, Buttons

Buttons, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

 

Kris Sanfords, Cigarette

Cigarette, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

Kris Sanford, Fence

Fence, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

Kris Sanford, Flowered Dresses

Flowered Dresses, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

 

 

Kris Sanford, Folding Chairs

Folding Chairs, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

Kris Sanford, Hat

Hat, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

 

Kris Sanford, Intertwined

Intertwined, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

Kris Sanford, Lei

Lei, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

Kris Sanford, Like Spoons

Like Spoons, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

 

Kris Sanford, Necklace

Necklace, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

Kris Sanford, Polka Dots

Polka Dots, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

 

Kris Sanford, Racket

Racket, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

 

Kris Sanford, The Garden

The Garden, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

 

Kris Sanford, The Mentor

The Mentor, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

 

Kris Sanford, Well Suited

Well Suited, 2015
archival inkjet print
10x10” in.
edition of 20

 

 

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May 25, 2018

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Helen Levitt, New York City, 1942

Visual Art Source Reviews Maggie Taylor's Current Exhibition

May 2, 2018

Maggie Taylor
Catherine Couturier Gallery, Houston, Texas
Recommendation by Donna Tennant


Maggie Taylor, “First the Fish Must Be Caught” from “Through the Looking Glass,” 2017, pigmented digital print

Continuing through May 12, 2018

While initially studying philosophy at Yale University, Maggie Taylor began her interest in photography during her sophomore year. Later, while pursuing her MFA in photography at the University of Florida, she would arrange and shoot intricate still lifes as subject matter. Upon discovering Photoshop, however, her creative life changed. She began moving away from the camera and by 1996 had abandoned it completely, using a light-sensitive scanner instead. Three decades later, Taylor is known for her haunting and compelling digital prints. In 2008 she published her version of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” 45 illustrations accompanying Lewis Carroll’s original text. Her latest work, “Through the Looking Glass,” is the sequel to that series. Like Carroll’s books, published during the Victorian Era, Taylor’s pieces allude to the 19th century, utilizing tintype and ambrotype portraits from that period in the images. In “Through the Looking Glass, and What Alice Found There” (1872), Carroll returns Alice to the fantasy world by walking through a mirror. Taylor’s series includes many characters from the book, including Tweedledum and Tweedledee, the Red King, White Queen, Humpty Dumpty, the Lion and the Unicorn.

“They’re at it Again” depicts a fight between the Lion and the Unicorn, which are symbols of the United Kingdom, with the lion representing England and the unicorn Scotland. In the book, Alice is crowned queen, and in Taylor’s “Through the Looking Glass” and “And What Alice Found There” Alice is shown wearing a crown. Many of the book’s personalities appear in “The Feast,” including a walrus, the lion and the unicorn, a king, two queens, and a masked crow. As the book ends, Alice awakens to find her kittens on her lap. The black kitten and white kitten appear in several of Taylor’s prints as well and, according to Alice, they represent the Red Queen and the White Queen. Taylor frequents flea markets, antique shops, online auctions and her own backyard to collect artifacts for her work, including taxidermy specimens, mounted insects, vintage toys, sea shells, feathers, eggs and nests. She uses original photographs to create the backgrounds, which often include a body of water or a river. Creating the final prints is a painstaking process that requires the manipulation of multiple layers of digital images over weeks or months, as Taylor persistently pursues perfection. The results are ambiguous scenarios that are part daydream, part nightmare, and always fascinating.